Dates Announced for New Jersey Child Care, Sports, Camps; Gottheimer Offers Youth Sports Bill

Gov. Phil Murphy announced three children-centric opening dates in New Jersey for programs that have been limited during the coronavirus crisis.

At the same time, Rep. Josh Gottheimer is an original cosponsor of new legislation providing relief for North Jersey youth sports and activities groups faced with economic uncertainty from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The state will allow all childcare centers to reopen June 15, non-contact organized sports activities can resume June 22 and youth day camps, including municipal summer rec programs, were given a July 6 start date. 

Childcare Essential

Murphy said reopening childcare was essential to allow for the reopening of the economy.

“As we prepare to take the first true steps of our restart and recovery, and as more and more workers prepare to get back out to their jobs, we must ensure a continuum of care for their children,” stated the governor at the May 29 press briefing.

While opening dates were announced, the guidance from the departments of Health as well as Children and Families will be offered at a later date. 

Outside Activities

Murphy did note the allowance of sports and camps goes in line with the state focusing on opening activities outside first. No contact drills will be allowed to begin with.

“We want our children to be able to enjoy their summers with their friends, participating in the activities that create lifelong memories,” Murphy said. 

Financial Help

On the federal side, Rep. Gottheimer’s COVID-19 Youth Sports and Working Families Relief Act would equip working families with the financial tools to bounce back from the current economic crisis. It is estimated youth sports and activities groups have seen at least $8.5 billion in losses nationwide due to COVID-19.

“Kids love little league, dance, and soccer—activities families already paid for cancelled due to the pandemic,” said Gottheimer. “With this new bill, we’re helping North Jersey families recoup costs and fees, while making sure these organizations survive this crisis for our kids to return to as we continue to reopen.”

The proposed legislation would authorize a relief fund for youth sports providers, programs and organizations currently affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and expand the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit to include expenses for youth physical activities, including organized individual and team sports, fitness and exercise, and other recreational activities. 

Daily Data

As of May 29, the cumulative number of coronavirus cases in New Jersey reached 158,844 with 1,117 new cases and 131 new deaths, bringing that total to 11,531. 

Of the total deaths in North Jersey, Essex County has the most with 1,647, followed by Hudson at 1,168, Bergen with 1,567, Passaic at 917, Morris at 610, Sussex at 147 and Warren with 131. 

State Testing 

The daily rate of infections from those tested as of May 25 rests at 6% on a total of approximately 26,000 tests. The state is no longer using serology tests as health officials explained those results show a past presence of the disease as well as a current one. By region, the north tested at 5%, the central at 6% and the south 8%.

Officials reported 2,707 patients are hospitalized with coronavirus—which included 183 new hospitalizations—while 231 patients were discharged. The north tier had 1,324 patients hospitalized, the central 776 and the south 607.

The daily discharge and new hospitalizations by tier for May 29 was the north having 88 hospitalizations and 104 discharges, the central 54 hospitalizations and 66 discharges, and the south 41 hospitalizations and 61 discharges.   

Of those hospitalized, 720 are in intensive care units and 544 on ventilators. There are currently 21 patients in field hospitals, with 467 treated overall. 

Hudson Tops County Count

Hudson has the most cumulative cases in the state with 18,297 followed by Bergen at 18,223, Essex at 17,546, Passaic at 16,045, Middlesex at 15,734, Union at 15,610, Ocean at 8,627, Monmouth at 8,100, Mercer at 6,775, Morris at 6,367, Camden at 6,350, Somerset at 4,552, Burlington at 4,519, Cumberland at 2,209, Gloucester at 2,198, Atlantic at 2,154, Warren at 1,153, Sussex at 1,106, Hunterdon at 981, Cape May at 611 and Salem at 602.

 Another 1,095 cases are still under investigation to determine where the person resides.

State officials are tracking cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in children, leading to  patients testing positive for COVID-19. As of May 29, no new cases were reported, leaving the total at 26 or children ranging in age from 1-18. Of the 26, 18 tested positive for COVID-19 and six are currently hospitalized. No deaths have been reported from the disease. 

While only a small sample, the State’s Commissioner of Health Judith Persichilli noted the racial breakdown was 19.2% White, 26.9% Black, 30.8% Hispanic and 7.7% Asian.

Demographic Breakdown

The racial breakdown of the record deaths was 53% White, 19% Black, 19% Hispanic, 6% Asian and 3% another race. Murphy has noted the rates in the black and Hispanic communities are running about 50% more than their population in the state. 

In regards to the underlying disease of those who have passed, 59% had cardiovascular disease, 43% diabetes, 32% other chronic diseases, 17% neurological conditions, 15% chronic renal disease, 10% cancer and 14% other. Persichilli has stated most cases have multiple underlying conditions which would push the percentage of 100%.

A census of ages for 9,941 confirmed deaths shows 47% of deaths are of those 80 year old and up, 33% in the range of 65-80, 16% between 50-65 and 4% under the age of 49. 

Long-term Care Facilities

Health officials noted 544 long-term care facilities are reporting at least one case of COVID-19 and accounted for 32,097 of the cases, broken down between 21,650 residents and 10,447 staff. The state’s official death total will now be reported as those that are lab confirmed, which was 4,858 on May 28. The facilities are reporting to the state of 5,828 residents deaths and 105 staff deaths. 

In a by-county breakdown:  

Bergen County 

  • 63  Facilities with Outbreaks
  • 3056 Total Resident Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 1529 Total Staff Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 904  Resident Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities
  • 10  Staff Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities

Essex County 

  • 46  Facilities with Outbreaks
  • 2030 Total Resident Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 919 Total Staff Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 544  Resident Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities
  • 19  Staff Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities

Morris County 

  • 42  Facilities with Outbreaks
  • 1354 Total Resident Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 619 Total Staff Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 448  Resident Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities
  • 3  Staff Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities

Passaic County 

  • 25  Facilities with Outbreaks
  • 1102 Total Resident Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 655 Total Staff Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 329  Resident Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities
  • 13  Staff Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities

Hudson County 

  • 15  Facilities with Outbreaks
  • 750 Total Resident Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 487 Total Staff Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 208  Resident Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities
  • 7  Staff Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities

Warren County 

  • 7  Facilities with Outbreaks
  • 401 Total Resident Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 114 Total Staff Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 109  Resident Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities
  • 1  Staff Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities

Sussex County 

  • 6  Facilities with Outbreaks
  • 248 Total Resident Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 121 Total Staff Cases at Long Term Care Facilities 
  • 101  Resident Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities
  • 4  Staff Deaths reported by Long Term Care Facilities

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